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NEVVS OF FRIENDS.

LIST OF THE YEARLY MEETING WISITING COMMITTEE.

For the convenience of the committee and other Friends, we print herewith the names and post-office addresses of the members of the committee appointed at the late session of Philadelphia Yearly Meeting, to encourage Friends to a more faithful attention to the requirements of our Discipline, and the upholding and sustaining of our Religious Society. The list is furnished us by the clerk, William Wade Griscom.

Samuel S. Ash, 21 N. 10th st., Philadelphia, Pa.
Clement Biddle, Chadd's Ford, Pa.
Clement M. Biddle, 531 Commerce st., Philada., Pa.
Joel Barton, Jr., Woodstown, N. J.
Henry T. Child, 634 Race st., Philadelphia, Pa.
Anne S. Clothier, 215 N. 13th st., Philadelphia, Pa.
S. Robinson Coale, 303 Cherry st., Philadelphia, Pa.
Sarah Ann Conard, West Grove, Pa.
Rebecca J. Cowperthwaite, Medford, N. J.
Martha Dodgson, Darby, Pa.
Macre P. Eyre, Dolington, Pa.
Isaac Eyre, Newtown, Pa.
Ezra Fell, Wilmington, Del.
Catherine P. Foulke, Stroudsburg, Pa.
Jonathan W. Gillam, Langhorne, Pa.
Sarah Griscom, 622 Marshall st., Philadelphia, Pa.
Wm. Wade Griscom, Woodbury, N. J.
Robert Hatton, Russellville, Pa.
Franklin T. Haines, Jarrettown, Pa.
Lydia H. Hall, West Chester, Pa.
Mary S. Harvey, Columbus, N. J.
Jeremiah Hayhurst, Lambertville, N. J.
Amos Hillborn, 21 N. 10th st., Philadelphia, Pa.
Rachel W. Hillborn, Fisher's lane, Germantown, Pa.
James W. Janney, Provident Life and Trust Čom.
pany, Philadelphia, Pa.
Matilda E. Janney, 1515 Centennial ave., Philadel-
phia, Pa.
Howard M. Jenkins, West Chester, Pa.
Charles Kirk, Johnsville, Pa.
Harriet E. Kirk, Johnsville, Pa.
Barclay Rnight, Edgewood, Pa.
Joseph B. Livezey, Clarksboro’, N. J.
Elizabeth Lloyd, Swarthmore, Pa.
Isaac C. Martindale, Camden, N. J.
Ellwood Michener, Toughkenamon, Pa.
John J. Moore, Quakertown, Pa.
Wm. C. Parry, Hainesport, N. J.
Abigail R. Paul, Salem, N. J.
Joseph Powell, Lansdowne, Pa.
Louisa J. Roberts, 421 N. 6th st., Philadelphia, Pa.
Jane D. Satterthwaite, Crosswicks, N. J.
Evan T. Swayne, Kennett Square, Pa.
Thomas W. Sheward, Wilmington, Del.
Mary M. Thomas, Norristown, Pa.
Watson Tomlinson, Byberry, Pa.
Aaron Twining, Wrightstown, Pa.
Elmira Twining, Wrightstown, Pa.
Margaretta Walton, Ercildoun, Pa.
Jannes V. Watson, 718 Franklin st., Philadelphia, Pa.
Edmund Webster, 2031 Locust st., Philadelphia, Pa.
Jesse Webster, Smyrna, Lancaster county, Pa.

—Whitewater Quarterly Meeting, at Richmond, Ind., on Sixth month 6th, was unusually large, the weather being pleasant, and the health of Friends generally good. No minister from abroad was with us. After a period of silence, Daniel Heacock, of Milton, Ind., spoke a few words of encouragement, followed by Sarah J. Bogue, of Lincolnville, Ind., and then by Dr. J. W. Haines. The business meeting was conducted in much harmony and love. A

concern was felt that we should appoint a committee to visit our small meetings, which was united with, and a committee appointed to labor as way opens. The meeting on First-day morning, the 7th, was very large. Anna M. Starr was first to break the silence, followed by Jesse K. James, of Lincolnville, and Dr. Jas. W. Haines, who, after speaking at some length, closed with supplication. The evening meeting was also well attended, and William W. Foulke, Jesse K. James and Sarah A. E. Hutton spoke.

—A meeting of Friends will be regularly held at the house of Thomas S. Hilliard, Cape May Point, N. J., on First-day mornings, at 10.30 o'clock, until Ninth month 27th. All interested Friends are cordially invited.

—Blue River Quarterly Meeting (Illinois Yearly Meeting) has established a new Monthly Meeting, composed of part of the members of Benjaminville Monthly Meeting, to be known as Richland Monthly Meeting, and held at Hoopeston, Vermillion county, Ill., on the first Fifth-day of the month, at 11 o'clock A.M. Isaac T. Lukens, Hoopeston, Ill., is Clerk. Mid-week meetings at the same place on Fifth-day, at the same hour.

—The First-day school at Solebury, Bucks county, Pa., is now held at the close of the meeting for worship, in the morning, one following the other without adjournment. The older persons present remain, and form an adult class. On First-day, the 21st inst., Samuel Swain, of Bristol, was present at meeting, and spoke. In the afternoon a temperance conference was held, at which there were addresses by Samuel Swain, Isaac C. Martindale, Joseph Flowers, Preston Eyre, Jeremiah Hayhurst and Henry M. Twining.

–An important meeting of the teachers of the West Chester Friends' First-day school was held last evening at the residence of Thomas B. Brown, on South Walnut street. A plan has been set on foot for the visiting of neighboring schools that are in session during the vacation of the West Chester. school. A committee was also appointed to arrange the organization of the school for next year.— West Chester Republican, 30th. w

—A local newspaper item reports the First-day school at Wrightstown, Bucks county, Pa., has been reopened, and in operation for several weeks with success. At the annual business meeting, recently, a. new superintendent and other officers were elected.

ORTHOD0X FRIENDS.

—At the recent session of New York Yearly Meeting (at Glen's Falls), reports showed 69 Bible Schools, with about 4,000 scholars, within the limits. of the Yearly Meeting. This is an increase of five schools within the past year. There are 74 ministers. in this Yearly Meeting. The “Evangelistic Committee’’ reported that 51 series of meetings had been held, at which 496 have been converted and 117 received as members. There have been established 17 prayer meetings, 5 young people's meetings. At one of the sessions, Luke Woodard spoke upon the necessity of having those in every mission field who can devote their whole time to the work. “Men who have business occupations cannot, and still continue their business, devote their whole time to the work. Therefore it devolves upon us to see that none are hindered from entering the work of God for lack of means.”

—New England Yearly Meeting was held last month (beginning on the 12th), at Portland, Maine. Among those present was Frank Modoc, one of the Modoc tribe of Indians, who is now a recognized minister. The statistical report showed: gain b births, 15; received by request, 141; loss by death, 81; released, 84; net gain during the year, 44; total membership, 4,370. A Committee on “Gospel Work” reported the holding of 19 series of meetings, at which “127 have professed conversion and 54 renewal.” Two nearly extinct meetings have been revived, and one new meeting established. The connection of the Yearly Meeting with the work of the Schools in North Carolina was terminated. “A letter was received from a member of the Maine M. E. Annual Conference, stating that a delegate had been appointed to represent them at this Yearly Meeting, but who had failed to appear, and asking that fraternal relations be established between us; with which this meeting united.” There were urgent ap. peals for help to missions. Eli Jones spoke in reference to work on Mt. Lebanon, Seth Rees on the Bishop Taylor African mission (with which Delia Rees, his sister, is connected), and M. M. Binford on Mexican mission work. The Women's Foreign Missionary Association, established a year ago, has 600

members, and the Yearly Meeting's Committee on

Foreign Missions reported the raising of $2,795.51

during the year.

—The Representative Meeting (corresponding to a Representative Committee or Meeting for Sufferings) of Indiana Yearly Meeting Inet at Richmond, on the 16th of last month, forty-one members being present, and adopted a very emphatic minute against the administration of outward baptism and “communion.” It recites as follows:

“Having learned with sorrow that certain individuals, holding the position of Ministers of the Gospel in one of the co-ordinate bodies of the Society of Friends, have partaken of the rites of water baptism and of the bread and wine in the so-called Commuhion of the Lord's Supper, some of whom have adininistered these rites to others, and some of them have been holding meetings within the limits of Indiana Yearly Meeting, and advocating, privately and publicly, their views, which are contrary to the testimony which the Society of Friends has always maintained as to the spiritual nature of Christ's kingdom ; and to the declaration of faith in our Book of Discipline, and to the united judgment of our Yearly Meeting in 1875. [this meeting] advises all Our meetings to refuse to receive, as acceptable Ministers of the Gospel, whether members of other Yearly Meetings or our own, those teaching doctrines or practising rites contrary to the above-named ‘Declaration of Faith ' and minute of the Yearly Meeting. The minutes or certificates of such should not be read in our meetings ; nor should meetings be appointed for them in our meeting-houses, nor should they be encouraged to labor within our borders.”

—Commenting upon the action taken by New York Yearly Meeting against water baptism, etc.,

the Chicago Christian Worker says: “To enter into much discussion of this subject at this time we think would tend to turn the attention of Friends away from the soul-saving work now being so abundantly blessed to the Church.”

NOTES.

William Dean Howells, known to our readers as the editor for a number of years of the Atlantic Monthly, and a very popular author, is a native of Ohio, but of Welsh extraction, his father being born in Wales. In a recent private note to the writer of this paragraph, he, (W. D. H.), says: “My father was born at ‘The Hay,” in Breconshire, and two years ago I visited Wales to look up our family. We were Quakers, and my great-grandfather came here in the last century, but returned to Wales. In 1807, my grandfather came out, and now the whole clan and cousinship are in

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“One of the writers pleaded in excuse that the early Friends attached little importance to this principle, and in general they even opposed it. Unfortunately, there are too many proofs available that he was right in this plea ; for whilst it is quite true that a few passages can be quoted from the Early Friends which are thoroughly Scriptural as to Substitutionary Atonement, yet the general drift, the preponderating tenor of many of those Friends, especially Barclay and Penn, is fairly open to a charge of unsoundness, and is markedly different from the plain drift of Holy Scripture. The modern Friends, as a body, hold more Biblical, more Apostolic views on this point than their predecessors.”

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That Barclay and Penn should be “open to the charge of unsoundness,” from the standpoint of Friends, must strike us as a rather entertaining suggestion, but there can be no doubt that many of the “Orthodox” body, in this country as in England, are obliged to so regard them. And, indeed, when the doctrine of the “Inner Light' is disowned it seems hardly worth while to hesitate at whatever else may be needful to satisfy the theological demands of the Evangelical position. * * * *

Delaware College, at Newark, Delaware, which has received young women for several years, has now decided to abandon the co-educational plan, and Will hereafter receive only young men. The explanation given for the change of policy is not very clear, but substantially it is that the experience of co-education has not been satisfactory, which, of course, might be inferred. It is quite true, we think, that to educate young men and women under one roof requires several favorable conditions, and that without these present it should not be attempted. Probably the experience of Friends is as satisfactory as can reasonably be hoped for, but we must not forget that it is attained by having, in the outset, pupils of a selected class, whose training has been good, whose tastes and inclinations are in the direction desired, and that these are under an unrelaxed oversight throughout the whole of their stay in school. No one must imagine that the results at Swarthmore are possible everywhere, or that they are attained without patient and assiduous care. We would not advise co-education everywhere and under all circumstances; it is a maturity of favorable conditions.

* +
*

The good work done by graduates of Swarthmore is one of the gratifying evidences of the success of that institution. The Howard Collegiate Institute, for young women, at West Bridgewater, Mass., established two years ago by Helen Magill and her sisters, held very satisfactory closing exercises on Fifth-day, the 18th ultimo. One of the essays, by Marion Magill, contrasted the Anti-Slavery poems of Whittier and Longfellow, and recitations from the former followed. Addresses were delivered by Edward Everett Hale, Ex-Governor Henry B. Long, (who is a Trustee of the institution), and others. The school, it is stated, “is now in a very promising condition.” There are some 40 scholars, of whom 18 are from a distance, 22 from the neighborhood.

ITEMS.

Wom EN manage 20 dairy farms in Iowa. Nearly 1,000 farms in that State are owned by women.

Gover NOR HILL, of the state of New York, has signed the bill that provides for the punishment of those careless builders, who, by failing to furnish secure scaffoldings, ladders, and other necessary contrivances for the safety of their workmen while at work, imperil their lives. The purpose of the law is good, as it is designed to prevent those accidents which are so often due simply to the wanton carelessness of builderS.

WE are indebted to Pompeii for our great industry of canned fruits. Years ago, when the excavations were beginning, a party of Americans found, in what had been the pantry of a house, many jars of preserved figs. One was opened, and they were found to be fresh and good. Investigation showed that the figs had been put into jars in a heated State, an aperture being left for the steam to escape, and then seased with wax. The hint was taken, and soon after fruit canning was introduced here, the process being identical with that in vogue at Pompeii twenty centuries ago. There are

many ladies among us who can tomatoes and peaches for domestic use, and do not realize that they are indebted for this art to the people of Pompeii.

BEDLOE's OR BEDLOW’s ISLAND, New York, where the Liberty statue is to be erected, has a curious history, which makes it an appropriate place for a memorial to Liberty. Its owner was Isaac Bedlow, and in 1670 the Governor of the State issued an instrument, declaring that for and in consideration of valuable improvements made by Mr. Bedlow on his island, it should in the future be known as Love Island, and should be a privileged place where no arrest could be made or warrant served, except by special consent of the Governor. The people did not take kindly to the change of name : the island continued to be known as Bedlow's, and this has been in recent time misspelled Bedloe. In looking up the history of the island deeds were found to the most valuable part of New York on both sides of Broadway which was sold to Isaac Bedlow about two hundred years ago for one dollar an acre.— Public Ledger.

THE second geological Survey of Pennsylvania has just published advance copies of its report on the anthracite coal region, which gives important information about the production and shipments of 1884. During that year there were 377 producing collieries. Nearly one-half of the whole number shipped their products over the Reading railroad, that line carrying about thirty-six per cent. of the shipments. Six collieries had an annual production of Gover 300,000 tons each. The largest production of any one colliery was 506,631 tons from the Susquehanna No. 5, at Nanticoke, operated in the interest of the Pennsylvania Railroad. The total shipment in 1884 was 30,718,293 tons and the total production 32,641,499 tons, or a million and a third less than in 1883. More than half of total product came from the Lackawanna and Wyoming coal fields, while the Pottsville coal field which, up to 1857, produced more than half the anthracite coal sent to market, produced in 1884 less than ten per cent. of the total. Two-thirds of all the anthratice coal mined is consumed in Pennsylvania, New York and New Jersey. Only sixteen per cent. goes to the New England States, less than nine per gent. to the West and a little over four per cent. to the South. Five hundred and seventy-five million tons of anthracite have been mined since 1820, when operations commenced. When the recent war broke out the product was just about one-fourth of what it is today, and the business has about doubled within the last fifteen years. All these facts and many others are clearly set forth in the report of the Geological Survey and an admirable map which accompanies it.

THE Trenton correspondent of the New York Tribune says: “The State School Fund has received more attention than usual of late, owing to some unusually large investments by the commissioners. The fund amounts to three and a quarter millions, derived from the sale and lease of riparian lands and is protected by the constitution from diversion to any purpose except the support of free public schools, for which the increase alone may be used. Heretofore, the Only charge upon it was an annual appropriation of $100,000 for the schools, distributed by the State Board of Education. Last winter shares amounting to nearly $90,000 were added and the fund is not likely to increase for the present. The original intention was to pile up a large sum the income of which could be disposed of to assist the schools in poor districts. The readiness with which communities, amply able to support their own schools, called upon the State for aid, showed after a time that the best policy to increase interest in education was not to be found in the exercise of charitable aid, and the fund has lost favor.

Investments in mortgages to the amount of a million

proved unfortunate and have been a source of difficulty and at present the money is placed in Governinent bonds, State bonds and the bonds of school distriots.”

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SAMUEL C. HUEY, President. HENRY C. BROWN, Secretary.

THE UNION TRUST COMPANY.,

611 & 613 CHESTNUT ST., PHILADELPHIA.

Al JTHORIZED CAPITAL - - - - - - - - - - $1,000,000. PAID UP CAPITAL - - - - - - - - - - - - - $500,000

Acts as Executor, Administrator, Assignee, etc., alone or in connection with an individual appointee. Executes trusts of every description knowu to the law. All trust assets kept separate from those of the Company. Burglar-Proof Safes to rent at $5 to $60 per annum. Wills kept in Vaults without charge. Bonds, Stocks and other valuables taken under guarantee. Paintings, Sta'uary, Bronzes, etc., kept in Fire-Proof Vaults, Money received on

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deposite at interest. JAMES LONG, President; JOHN G. READING, Vice President; MAHLON H. STOKES, Treasurer and Secretary; D. R. PATTERSON Trust

Officer.
I}IRECTORS:—James Long, Alfred S. Gillett, Dr. Charles P. Turner, William S. Price, John T. Monroe, W. J. Nead, Thomas R. Patton, John G.
Reading, James S. Martin, D. Hayes Agnew, M.D., Jos. I. Keefe, Robert Patterson, Theodore C. Engel, Jacob Naylor, Thomas G. Hood, Edward L.
Perkins, PHILADELPHIA; Samuel Riddle, GLEN RIDDLE, Pa.; Dr. George W. Reiley, HARRISBURG, Pa.; J. Simpson Africa, HUNTINGDoN ; Henry S.
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TNCORPORATED 1836. CHARTER PERPETUAL. CAPITAL, $450,000. SURPLUS, $827,338.
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PRESIDENT, SAMUEL R. SHIPLEY. VICE PRESIDENT, T. WISTAR BROWN. VICE PRESIDENT AND ACTUARY, ASA S. WING MANAGER of INSURANCE DEPT., JOs, ASHBROOK. TRUST OFFICER, J. ROBERTS Fööížič.

Reuben Wilson

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