Изображения страниц
PDF
EPUB
[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][subsumed][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small]

III.-SCHOOLS OF SCIENCE.

SCHOOLS OF SCIENCE ENDOWED BY THE NATIONAL LAND GRANT.

Only thirty-two of the forty-eight schools properly reported under this head appear in Table 13. Of the other sixteen schools, the South Georgia College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts at Thomasville, Ga., has made no report to this Office since 1825–86, and does therefore not appear in the table. The College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts of the University of North Carolina has been abolished and a new school, the North Carolina College of Agricnlture and Mechanic Arts has been located at Raleigh, under the presidency of Alexander Q. Holliday. No report was received from it, as its first session begins on October 3, 1889. The remaining fourteen schools are so closely united with the institutions of which they are departments that it is impossible to separate the work and funds without duplication, so that the statistics of these schools are reported in Table 7, with the institutions to which they belong.

Remarks on Table 8.-From the summary given in Table 8, it appears that the total number of professors and instructors reported by the thirty-two schools was 670, which is an increase of 8.06 per cent. over the number reported in 1887–88, while the increase in the number of students is 18.38 per cent. The total income reported by these schools is $1,407,212, of which amount 37.4 per cent. was derived from State or municipal appropriations, 40.95 per cent. from productive funds, and 15.98 per cent. from tuition fees, leaving a small portion unaccounted for. Comparing these percentages with the corresponding percentages of the previous year, we find that the percentage of income derived from appropriations in 1888–89 exceeds that for 1887–88 by 4.47 per cent., and that for 1886–87 by 4.45 per cent.

Of the total amount received from tuition fees, 68.96 per cent. is reported by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and 17.11 per cent. by Cornell University, while the remaining 13.93 per cent. is distributed in small amounts among thirteen institutions.

The number of institutions of this class maintaining preparatory departments is constantly decreasing, thus affording more time and means to the instruction in collegiate branches. The Maryland Agricultural College, in its catalogue for 1888–89, states that the public educational facilities are believed to be such in all parts of the State as to render it unnecessary for the college to maintain a preparatory departe ment.

TABLE 8.-Summary of statistics of schools of science endowed by the national land grant for 1888–89.--PART I.

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][subsumed][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

TABLE 8.-Summary of statistics of schools of science endowed by the national land grant for 1888–89.-Part II.

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small]

PROGRESS IX FIVE YEARS.

In the report for 1897-88 an attempt was made to show the ratio of increase in the instructors, students, and productive. funds of tbe land-grant colleges in 5 years. As these ratios virtually represent the entire growth of the schools, a similar scheme of tabulation (Table 9) has been prepared for this report, taking for basis the infor. mation received in the years 1883-84 and 13-4-89.

The greatest ratio of increase in instructors is reported by Purdue University, in which institution the increase is 200 per cent. The decrease in the number of students in the five institutions reporting a decrease is due, very probably, to the reorganization of tho institutions.

TABLE 9.-Showing, for the colleges endoured with the national land grant, the percent

age of increase or of decrease in instructors, students, and productive funds in 1888–89, as compared with 1883–84, according to returns made to this Office.

Iustructors.

Students.

Productive funds.

Name.

Increase. Decrease. Increase. Decrease. Increase. Decrease.

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

Alabama State Agricultural and Me

chanical College.
Arkansas Industrial Tniversity
Colorado State Agricultural College.
Sheffield Scientific School of Yale

University.
Delaware College.
Southwest Georgia Agricultural Col-

lege.
Middle Georgia Military and Agri.

cultural Co lege.
University of Illinois..
Purdue University
Iowa Agricultural College.
Kansas State Agricultural College...
Agricultural and Mechanical Col.

lege of Kentucky.
Maine State College of Agriculture

and the Jechanic Arts
Maryland Agricultural Collego.....
Massachusetts Agricultural College
Massachusetts Institute of Techoul.

ogy
Michigan State Agricultural Collego.
Agricultural and Mechanical Col-

lege of Mississippi.
Alcorn Agricultural and Mechanical

College
Missouri School of Mines and Metal-

lurgy.
New Hampshire College of Agricul.

ture and the Mechanic Arts.
Rutgers Scientific School...
Cornell University
Oregon State Agricnltural College
Pennsylvania State College.
Claflin University...
State Agricultural and Alecharical

College of Texas.
Virginia Agricultural and Moclan-

ical College.
Hampton Normal anıl agricultural

Institute.

50.21

31.31
59,54

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

DISTRIBUTION OF STUDENTS IN PRACTICAL WORK.

Table 10 represents, as far as possible, the distribution of students of the land-grant colleges in the various lines of practical work afforded by the institutions. This rep. resentation is very incomplete, owing to the failure of many of the institutions to answer the inquiries on this subject. The table is an important one, for it shows not only the extent to which students avail themselves of the opportunities for practical training afforded them, but, taken in connection wit' similar tables in previous reports, it shows in which of these lines of practical work the institutions are developing most rapidly.

« ПредыдущаяПродолжить »