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thrown up ver 'strong works in its tear: and it geing farther known that they had stationed a- large force at Purmerend, in an almost inaccessible position, covered by an inundated country; the dcbouches from which were strongly fortified, and in the hands of a corps of the enemy ; which corps, as our. army advanced, would be placed in our rear: intelligence being received of all these circumstances, the British commander naturally paused. -,The obsta< cles here enumerated might have been' overcome by the perfevering courage of the troops, under his command, had mot the state of the weather, the ruined condition oftlie roads, and the total want of the necessary su plies, arising from the above cau es, presented additional difficulties, which demanded most serious consideration. The duke of York, therefore, having maturely weighed the circumstances, in which the army under his command was thus placed, thought it adviseable, with the concurrencc of general Abercromby, and the lieutenant-generals of the army, to withdraw the troops, from this advanced position, to their forz-mer station, at Schagenbrirg; from whence, on the ninth of October, his royal highness dispatched his secretary, colonel Brownrig, to London, in order to give a circumstantial account of the state of affairs in Holland, and to receive his . maiestyk farther instructions.

In the mean time,_the enemy har

. rasfed our line of defence at Schngenbrug, by daily, though partial, attacks; the most serious of which was made by general Daendels in person. That general, on the tenth ofOctober, attacked the right wing of the British forces, upon an advan

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ced poft near Wincle, under the command of prince William of Gloucesier, r with 6000 men, and six pieces of cannon; endeavouring to force this post -by every exertion.

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prince had only 1200 men, and two pieces of Cannon; yet he- obligedthe Dutch general to retreat, with the loss ot 200 men killed, and one French general. But general Daendels being almost immediately reinsorced by 4000 Dutch troo s, the prince of Gloucester was un er the neceffity of falling back to Cohorn. The loss ofthe English, in this action, did not exceed three killed, and about twelve wounded. The prince, during the action, had his horse shot under him; but be received no injury himtelf, though exposed to the greatest personal danger, under a heavy fire, being frequently in front of the line, animating the exertions of 'his troops by his example. ' The efforts of' our marine force, in the Zuyder-Zee, and other parts of the Dutch coast, were continued, amidst these transactions on land, with unahated activity. Many gun-beats and several light ships of war were taken from the enemy; and an attack, that, on the llth of October, they made on the town of' Lemmer, which had come into our possessron, as above related, was gallantly repulsed by the. British sailors and rnarines, under the com

mand of captain Boorder, of the

Wolverene bomb-ship.

About this time an attempt is supposed to have been made to gain over to our cause the Batavian general Daendels. That general was sound to be indeed a friend to pence, but not to the Stadthol.

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