Изображения страниц
PDF
EPUB

SQUIRE D—AND THE TEACHER.

167

I am

.

with prayer.

has got

hope for such a poor miserable sinner?'. The tears began to run down her cheeks; then she smiled; then she caught me by both hands, and, looking up in my face, she said, 'Oh, my dear friend, I am so glad!'. Why?' said I;

are you glad because I am in trouble ?' Oh, my dear sir,' says she, this is the Spirit of God operating on your heart.' All at once a great light seemed to shine into my mind. All that I had been learning for so many weeks seemed now just as plain as A B C. Said I, 'Come, Miss Hkneel down, then, and pray for me.' And she did pray for me; and I do bless God for his wonderful mercy to such a poor hardened sinner. I believe that God did change my heart just while that very prayer was going up. All at once it just came; I loved my Bible, and I loved to pray, and I could not bear the company that I used to take so much delight in.

“On the next Sabbath, Miss H- asked me to go along with her and the children to the school; which was, and had been, a Sunday School, though we never suspected it. And here came a trial. If I go, they will

say getting religious ; if I stay, it will be a sin, for I know I ought to go; and then it will grieve Miss H These last considerations were the strongest; 80 I went. The room was crowded with children, all waiting for their teacher ; I thought they all looked happy: After a little while, Miss H took the Bible, and coming to me, she said, 'Mr. D- will

you read and pray with us this morning P' I was startled ; my very heart trembled. Said 1, "Oh no, not now.' Then she read a chapter, and prayed herself. Oh, how I felt, to think that I was ashamed to pray before those

children! Ah, thought I, this will never do ; I will come here and pray next Sunday. That night I read and prayed with my family ; and the next Sabbath I opened the school

The news spread soon all through the settlement. “Dreligion, and is praying in the Sunday School! D-going to school on Sunday, and praying! very strange news this. Very soon the people began to drop into our Sunday School; every Sunday a regular increase. Then Miss said to me, You had better read us a sermon at the Sunday School after the other exercises are over.' She selected the sermons and I read them. Our meetings grew very solemn. Presently we sent word to a good man at B- to send us a minister. He did so. The minister came and preached for us. The little school-house could not contain one-half the people who crowded to hear him. We held our meetings in the open air, under the trees.

Ah, that was a wonderful time! the cry of the anxious sinner went up from every hearth-stone and roof-tree. The Spirit of God was moving mightily upon the hearts of the people, and many were born unto the kingdom every day. All this brought a great change in our settlement. Instead of the dance, and the gaming-table, and the foolish song, we had meetings for prayer and praise ; and the tavern and still-house were exchanged for the temple of God.

“The Sabbath became a day of holy rest among a people who used to spend it in revelry or idleness. Houses of worship were built, where our population flocked every Sabbath to hear the preached word from the living minister; and, in the course of two or three years, hundreds professed faith in Christ, and joined the church. We have had a flourishing church here ever since. Ah," said the good man in his peculiarly emphatic way, "see what God hath wrought for us.

How often have I reproached myself, when I contrasted the heroic conduct of this devoted female with my own man-fearing spirit! She has gone to her reward ; her memory will be

cherished for a few more years in the hearts of those to whom her humble efforts were of such immense value, and then pass away and be forgotten ; but her influence will pass on, an ever-increasing current, down the long tracts of time, and throughout the endless ages of eternity.-Christian Treasury.

[graphic][subsumed][subsumed][ocr errors][subsumed][subsumed][merged small][subsumed]

Original Papers.

GLEANINGS FROM THE VINEYARD.-THE COINER’s Boy. Those who were in the habit of visiting Westminster a few years ago, of passing through its dingy courts and alleys, and breathing the stifling, deadly vapours that flowed in thickening currents from the doors and windows of every dwelling—the murky. hiding-places of outlawry and infamy,-must now feel greatly relieved by the bracing western breezes, that, like angels of mercy, sweep along the expansive opening where the future Victoria Street is to be erected. Everything around seems to wear a more cheerful aspect; the tattered urchins, who have emerged from their smoky cabins to gambol among the ruins, appear more human; their pallid faces are lighted up with healthful hues, even although forced at night to nestle in more crowded tenements since their former ones were destroyed. Thus far the alterations are goodreal“ improvements,”—and were the new street to consist of model lodging-houses for the poor, erected on the principle recommended, and partially adopted by the Labourers' Friend Society, it would prove a noble monument to the philanthropic wisdom of our legislators, and one of the greatest blessings they could confer upon the British metropolis.

The poor would be forced to regard their wealthy neighbours as benefactors and friends; a meet compensation would be made for past neglect; one of the most dreadful colonies of physical impurity and systematic and hereditary guilt that ever disgraced a nation, would be converted into a 6 Model Parish” for order and domestic comfort-a fitting sequel to the evangelistic efforts that have been made during the

years. But, instead of this, the so-called “improvements" about to be effected must operate very differently, both on the minds and circumstances of the Westminster poor.

Driven back into the dilapidated courts behind, to crowd and fester in their own corruption more thickly than before, their stifled, filthy rooms contrasting with the elegant shops and dwellings, (and, mayhap, the magnificent Popish cathedral,) in the adjoining street, they will look upon the wealth and power by which these changes bave been effected, with feelings of jealousy, indignation, and resentment. Such feelings have already been manifested; many of the poor creatures, unable to find rooms sufficiently cheap in other localities, refused to quit their miserable abodes until the houses were actually unroofed, and the wind and rain beating upon themselves and children. In such circumstances, would not the words of one of their greatest poets prove the welcome utterances of their resentful feelings ?

“Whence comes this strange, injurious, irksome cold ?
Whence this new grandeur that my eyes behold?
This wid'ning distance that I daily see?

Hath wealth done this? Then wealth's opposed to me!" We think we could give a practical hint to Dr. Wiseman upon this subject, as we understand he is anxious to have the Italian cathedral

NO. XXXII.- VOL. III.

last ten

Q

Intelligence.

RICHMOND STREET RAGGED SCHOOLS. The Second Public Meeting of the friends and supporters of these schools, was held on the 27th of March, in the Infant School Room, Richmond Street, Lisson Grove, the Right Hon. the Lord Ashley (now Earl of Shaftesbury) presided. The proceedings were opened with prayer by the Rev. George Fisk, LL.B., the president of the Schools. The Chairman, after briefly stating the nature and object of Ragged Schools, said that those who promoted them ought not to feel disheartened, even though they should not perceive an immediate result of their labours, for so great are the difficulties they have to contend with, arising from the opposing influence of the life and habits of the parents of the children, that it will not be until this generation shall have passed away, and Ragged Scholars shall have themselves become parents, that the full benefit of these institutions will be felt. The noble Lord concluded, by earnestly entreating the co-operation of the meeting in supporting these schools, dwelling on the sure promise of God, that in due time we shall reap, if we faint not. The meeting was afterwards addressed by Messrs. Maberly, Howlett, Clayton, Payne, and Power. Mr. Bromley, the superintendent of the schools, gave some valuable and interesting facts, showing the benefits resulting from the Industrial classes. Mr. Anderson, of the Ragged School Union, bore testimony to the high character of the Schools, for good management and order. After a short address from the Rev. G. Fisk, the meeting separated.

The amount collected was £23. 68. 7d.

FOSTER STREET RAGGED SCHOOL,

LONG ALLEY, BISHOPSGATE. THE Annual Meeting of this school took place on Wednesday evening, the 23rd of April. R.C.L. Bevan, Esq., had consented to take the chair, but was prevented through unavoidable circumstances; with his usual liberality, however, he sent a donation of £10.108. Saml. Gurney, Jun., Esq., who presided, was supported_by John Masterman, Jun., and John Gurney Fry, Esqs. There were also present, Rev. J. Charlesworth, Rev. J. Branch, Rev. Mr. Tyler, and Mr. Anderson of the Ragged School Union. Several practical speeches were delivered, and, although not a full attendance, yet the collection was more liberal than on former years. Mr. Green, the respected superintendent of the Sunday School, returned thanks for himself and the teachers in a very effective speech, and a vote of thanks was given to the Chairman, coupled with the services of the Hon. Secretary, Mr. Lovegrove, which was duly acknowledged by both; the Secretary begged to remind the friends of Ragged Schools, another £100 per annum was absolutely necessary to work them efficiently, and hoped, that in the city of London friends would rally round the supporters, and place these schools in such a position, that a vast amount of additional good would result from them.

tions, where they were conducting themselves with propriety, and some were now attending respectable Sabbath Schools. In winter the Sunday School has an attendance of 200 children in the afternoons, and 300 in the evenings. The numbers at the Week Evening School average from 45 to 50. Many of the poor boys have there learned to read and write, who would otherwise have grown up in a state of extreme ignorance. One boy who was completely destitute

has been placed in an Industrial School, where he is doing well; and another has emigrated to Australia. The girls meet on Thursday and Friday evenings for reading, writing, and religious instruction. The sewing class, which meets on Monday evenings, is attended by from 65 to 80 of the elder girls, and from which a very great amount of moral and physical good has resulted; 312 articles of clothing have been made during the year, and purchased by the girls at a very low price. Children of whole families have thus been improved; their mothers have copied the example, and thus filthy and disorderly homes have, in a great measure, become the abodes of domestic comfort and peace. Numbers of girls who otherwise from want of decent clothing would have been refused admission into respectable families have procured comfortable situations, where they continue to exemplify the benefits of former instruction. Chiefly through the aid of the Committee of the Ragged School Union, the debt of £85 remaining on the School last year has been removed. This has enabled the Committee to make very extensive improve. ments in the interior of the building, thus securing better arrangements and increased accommodations. Formerly the girls assembled in a small and inconvenie gallery, where upwards of 200 were often crowded into a space scarcely capable of containing 80. By the removal of this gallery, and the extension of a floor over the ceiling, a large and airy room has been erected over the Boys' School, capable of accommodating 250 children. This, with school furniture, has cost £150. But, through the kindness of the Earl of Shaftesbury, a lady has given £60 towards this amount; and, by the aid of other friends, the whole expense has been defrayed. The Meeting

was addressed by the Rev. John Charlesworth, Rector of St. Mildred's, Messrs. Atkinson, Macgregor, Payne, Cuthbertson, and Henson.

TRINITY CHURCH RAGGED SCHOOL,

WHITEHAVEN. THIS school has now been in existence eight years, and during that time the number of scholars has steadily increased. The number of admissions on the books is 342. The average attendance on Sundays is better, being sometimes upwards of 180. The Evening School is still continued, and with proportionate increase in the number of scholars. On many of these evenings 140 children have been present, seeking that instruction they have not the means of obtaining elsewhere. Their improvement is marked and encouraging, as is also their personal appearance. Great inconvenience is felt from the smallness of the room, it only being capable of accommodating 130 with any degree of ease.

The Committee hope that a suitable site upon which to build could be obtained, provided the requisite funds could be raised, and they believe that it is only necessary to make this known to elicit a ready and liberal response from the friends of tho institution. The receipts for the year were £57. 18. lld.; and the expenses £56, 12s. 9 d.

GOLDEN LANE RAGGED SCHOOL. THE Annual Meeting of this school was held in the Literary and Scientific Institution, Aldersgate Street, on Thursday Evening, May 29th, 1851. In the absence of the Earl of Shaftesbury, who was prevented by Parliamentary duties, F. Bennoch, Esq., occupied the Chair.

Mr. Anderson, the Secretary, read the Annual Report, which stated that the school in its different departments had made satisfactory progress. 175 children had been admitted into the Infant School during the year; several had left for situa

Original Papers.

GLEANINGS FROM THE VINEYARD.-TIE COINER's Boy. Those who were in the habit of visiting Westminster a few years ago, of passing through its dingy courts and alleys, and breathing the stifling, deadly vapours that flowed in thickening currents from the doors and windows of every dwelling—the murky. hiding-places of outlawry and infamy,-must now feel greatly relieved by the bracing western breezes, that, like angels of mercy, sweep along the expansive opening where the future Victoria Street is to be erected. Everything around seems to wear a more cheerful aspect; the tattered urchins, who have emerged from their smoky cabins to gambol among the ruins, appear more human; their pallid faces are lighted up with healthful hues, even although forced at night to nestle in more crowded tenements since their former ones were destroyed. Thus far the alterations are goodreal“ improvements,”—and were the new street to consist of model lodging-houses for the poor, erected on the principle recommended, and partially adopted by the Labourers' Friend Society, it would prove a noble monument to the philanthropic wisdom of our legislators, and one of the greatest blessings they could confer upon the British metropolis.

The poor would be forced to regard their wealthy neighbours as benefactors and friends; a meet compensation would be made for past neglect; one of the most dreadful colonies of physical impurity and systematic and hereditary guilt that ever disgraced a nation, would be converted into “ Model Parish” for order and domestic comfort-a fitting sequel to the evangelistic efforts that have been made during the last ten

years. But, instead of this, the so-called "improvements” about to be effected must operate very differently, both on the minds and circumstances of the Westminster poor. Driven back into the dilapidated courts behind, to crowd and fester in their own corruption more thickly than before, their stifled, filthy rooms contrasting with the elegant shops and dwellings, (and, mayhap, the magnificent Popish cathedral,) in the adjoining street, they will look upon the wealth and power by which these changes have been effected, with feelings of jealousy, indignation, and resentment. Such feelings have already been manifested; many of the poor creatures, unable to find rooms sufficiently cheap in other localities, refused to quit their miserable abodes until the houses were actually unroofed, and the wind and rain beating upon themselves and children. In such circumstances, would not the words of one of their greatest poets prove the welcome utterances of their resentful feelings ?

“Whence comes this strange, injurious, irksome cold?
Whence this new grandeur that my eyes behold?
This wid'ning distance that I daily see?

Hath wealth done this? Then wealth's opposed to me!” We think we could give a practical hint to Dr. Wiseman upon this subject, as we understand he is anxious to have the Italian cathedral

NO. XXXII.VOL. III.

a

Q

« ПредыдущаяПродолжить »