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Senator Burchard asked for and obtained leave of absonee for Senator Reed till Friday, 20th January. Senator Strong asked for and obtained leave of absence for Senator Williams till Thursday, 19th January.

4.

On motion of Senator Clark, The Senate adjourned till 7 1-2 o'clock Monday evening, 16th January.

MONDAY, JANUARY 16, 1871–7 1-2 P. M.

Senate met pursuant to adjournment. In the absence of the Lieutenant-Governor and the President pro tem., Senator Williams, Senator Griswold was, on motion of Senator Burchard, called to the chair. Roll called—quorum present. Reading of the minutes dispensed with.

LETTERS, PETITIONS, MEMORIALS, Etc., Presented and referred.

By Senator Schmidt :
Mem. No. 3, S.,
The petition of John T. Zimes and others, asking for an increase
of the fees of justices of the peace.
To committee on Judiciary.

By Senator Schmidt:
Mem. No. 4, S.,
Petition of E. B. Treat and others, asking for an increase of the
fees of justices of the peace.
To committee on Judiciary :

REsoLUTIONS CONSIDERED.

Res. No. 1, S.,

Inviting the resident clergy to open the sessions of the Senate with prayer,

Was, on motion of Senator Bur chard,

Laid aside till Wednesday morning.

BILLS INTRODUCED
On leave granted, read first and second times and referred.

By Senator Deuster:

No. 9, S.,

To authorize the Western Union Railroad Company to guarantec the payment of bonds of the Satula, Ackley and Dakota Railroad Company, and other companies.

To committee on Railroads.

By Senator Cameron :
No. 10, S,
To regulate the time of holding the general terms of the circuit
court for the sixth judicial circuit.
To committee on Judiciary.

By Senator Cameron :
No. 11, S.,
To authorize the appointment of phonographic reporters for the
circui , court of the several counties of the sixth judicial circuit.
To committee on Judiciary,

By Senator Davis:
No. 12, S., -
To authorize and direct the city clerk of the city of Madison to
add to the tax roll of 1870, certain special taxes and assessments,
and to legalize the relevying of the same,
Which was, on motion of Sen itor Davis,
Taken up,
The rules suspended, and the bill passed.

By Senator Schmidt :
No. 13 S., - -
A bill relating to the public schools of Manitowoc.
Which was, on motion of Senator Schmidt,
Ordered printed. -
To Committee on Education.

By Senator Schmidt : No. 14 S., . A bill to incorporate the Saint Ambrosius Academy of Saint Nazlaus. To Committee on Education.

By Senator Little :
No, 15 S.,
A bill to enable the board of supervisors of Iowa county to elect a
superintendent of poor. -
Which was, on motion of Senator Little,
Taken up,
The rules suspended, and
Tue bill was passed.

By Senator Schantz :
No. 16 S.,
A bill to legalize the tax roll of the town of Erin, in the county
of Washington, for the year 1810.
Which was, on motion of Senator Schantz,
Taken up. -
The rules were suspended, and
The bill was passed.

By Senator Miner:

No. 17, S.,

To amend chapter 168, private and iocal laws of 1868, entitled “an act to amend chapter 606, private and local laws of 1867, entitled “an act to divide the town cf Armenia, in the county of Juneau.’”

To committee on Town and County Organization.

BILLS CONSIDERED.

No. 5, S.,

A bill o extend the time for the collection of taxes in the town of Westford and the east ward of the village of Randolph, in the county of Dodge, and to authorize the clerk of the board of said county to apportion taxes to said town and village,

Introduced by Sen. Burchard on Friday, and referred to committee on State Affairs,

Was, on motion of Senator Burehard, called from committee and placed on the general file;

Then taken up,

The rules suspended, and

The bill was passed.

EXECUTIVE MESSAGES.

STATE OF WISCONSIN.
ExecutIve DEPARTMENT,
Madison, January 19, 1871.

To the Honorable, the Legislature :

I deem"it proper to coumunicate to your honorable body the sad intelligence of the death of Hon. Byron Paine, associate justice of the supreme court of this State, who departed this life on the evening of the 13th inst. The loss of such a man to the State is almost irreparable. His onlinent ability and valuable survices as a jurist, his stainless integrity and devotion to duty as judge, and his unblemished private life, endeared him to the people. and will cause him to be long remembered as one of the best men of his time in the State. # The funeral will take place from his late residence in Madison, tomorrow morning, at eleven o'clock.

LUCIUS FAIR CHILD.

STATE of WisconsiN,
Executive DEPARTMENT,
MAD1son, January 16, 1871.

To the Honorable, the Legislature: - *

As required by section six of article five of the constitution, I hereby communicate to your honorable body the several cases of re. prieves, pardons and commutations granted during the year 1870, with the reasons for granting the saue, as follows:

Statement of Pardons Granted in 1870.
proM County JAILs.

1. DANIEL BUTLER—

Convicted before the police court of Madison, Dane county, on the 17th day of November, A. D. 1870, of the crime of assault and battery, and thereupon sentenced to pay a fine of thirty dollars and costs of prosecution, and in default of payment committed to the common jail of said county. Pardon granted January 28, 1870, upon recommendation of sheriff of Dane county, and many other worthy citizens of Madison, who state that said Butler is very poor and usable to pay the fine and costs in default of which he was imprisoned. He remained in jail 73 days, which was deemed a sufficient punishment. The offence was committed while the prisoner was intoxicated. He promises to refrain in the future from the use of intoxicating liquors as a beverage, upon which condition the pardon is granted by Lieutenant Governor Pound.

2. WILLIs B. RAYMond—

Convicted before the circuit court of Waupaca county, on the — day of December, 1869, of the crime of forgery, and sentenced to imprisonment in the county jail of said county for one year. Pardon granted January 25, 1870, upon the recommendation of the county judge, district attorney, and a large number of reliable citizens of Waupaca county, who made statements which convinced me that till the commission of this offence the prisoner bore a good character; that the at was one of thoughtlessness, and not of intentional criminality; that he is ti uly penitent, and has nev. r sought to avoid the consequences of his crime, and that the ends of justice demanded his pardon.

3. John SANDs— Uonvicted before the police justice of Madison city, Dane county, March 5, 1870, of fishing in Lake Mendota, contrary to the ordinances of said city, and sentenced to pay a fine of five dollars and one-half the costs of prosecution; committed to jail in default of payment. Pardon granted Mareh 7, 1870, upon the recommendation of the constable by whom he was arrested aud the justice before whom he was tried. The offender is a mere boy, and his parants unable to pay the fine. The ordinance had but recently gone into effect and the boy was iguorant of its provisions.

4. CIIARLEs BerchER— Convicted before the police court of the city of Madison, Dane county, March 2, 1870, of the crime of larceny, and sentenced to imprisonment in the county jail for sixty days. Pardon granted April 14, 1870. The crime (stealing a buffalo robe) is represented to have been committed while the prisoner was in a state of stupid intoxication ; the prisoner h s heretofore borne a good reputation, and promises to abstain from the use of intoxicating liquors as a beverage. His pardon was granted, upon the condition that he do so, by Lieutenant Governor Pound.

5. CHARLEs BRockMAEAR— Convicted before the circuit court for Dane county, December 3, 1869, of the crime of assault with intent to murder, and sentenced to imprisonment in the county jail for nine months. Pardon granted July 22, 1870, upon recommendation of county judge, sheriff and district attorney. The prisoner is a common farm laborer, has a large family dependent on him for support, and if released so as to labor in the harvest field could earn money for their support the coming winter. He is penitent and promises to live in the future as he ought, and in the hope that he was reformed by this punishment the pardon was granted.

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