Изображения страниц
PDF
[ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors]

Neither the particular novelty of the affair, nor the magnifience with which it was, on one side at least, attended, were able to draw much of the public attention, to the interview which took place this year, between the Emperor of Germany, and the Empress of Russia. The latter having accompanied the Great Duke and Duchess of Russia, on their way to make the tour of Europe, proceeded, according to the concerted appointment, to Mohilow in Poland, where the meeting of those great potentates took place, in the month of June 1780. Form, etiquette, or ceremonial, were no parts of, nor no interruption to, the satisfaction which these illustrious personages received in each others conversation and acquaintance. After some stay at Mohilow, the emperor accompanied the Czarina on her return to Peters

[merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small]
[ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small]
[ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors]

from thence renounced all defences inconsistent with that which is so much more solid. We hope, and indeed it is now scarcely to be doubted, that the time is not far distant, when a trace of this inhuman pračtice, will not be found in any part of the western world. . However interesting and valuable the following transaction may be confidered in point of political oeconomy, and however it may even contribute to lessen the burthens of the people, it is not by way of placing it in any degree of competition with the former measure, that we in this place take notice of the prodigious reform which was made in the French IGing’s household ; that monarch, in pursuance of the new plan of ceconomy adopted in his court, having this year at one stroke abolished, no less than 406 offices in that department. The attempts (mostly ineffective) made by the court of Spain to raise money by loans in foreign countries, afforded sufficient evi

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

another

[ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

1780, the conduct of the Duke of

Modena, in abolishing the inquifition in his dominions, should by no means be overlooked. It indeed affords a new instance of the progress, which liberal, ideas with respect to toleration, are now making throughout Europe. A farther extension of the same ideas, may be hoped to reach to the civil and religious rights of mankind, as well as to a bare sufferance of their opinions. That prince, upon the death of the Grand Inquisitor at Reggio, immediately ordered that tribunal to be for ever abolished ; its revenues to be applied to other, and more laudable purposes ; and the

risons, and other buildings, which could preserve any memo

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

Retrospective view of affairs in America and the Wes. Indies, in the year 1780. State of the hostile armies on the side of New York, previous to, and at the arrival, of Gen. Sir Henry Clinton from the reduáion of Charles Town. Short campaign in the jerses. Conne.ficut farms. Springfield. Unexpected effect produced by the redućion of Charles Town, in renewing and exciting the spirit of union and resistance in America. Great hopes founded on the expected co-operation s a French fleet and army in the reduction of New York, and the final expulsion of the British forces from that continent. Marquis de la Fayette arrives from France. M. de Ternay, and the Count de Rochambeau, arrive oith a French Jouadron, and a body of land forces, and are put into possion of the fortifications and harbour of Rhode-Island. Admiral Arbuthnot blocks up the French squadron. Dispositions made by Sir Henry o, attacking the French auxiliaries. Gen. Washington pass the North River, with a view of attempting New York. Expedition to Rhode Island laid assae. Great difficulties experienced by Don Bernard de Galvez, in his

[ocr errors]

land and naval force sent out from Spain, in order to join M. de Giich n in

[ocr errors]

grand views formed by France and America, for the remainder of the cam

paign. Spanish fleet and army proceed to the Havannah ; and M. de Guichen returns from St. Domingo, with a convoy, to Europe. Great preparations made by the Americans for effectually co-operating with the French forces on the arrival of M. de Guichen. Washington’s army in

creased, for that purpose, to 20,000 men. Invasion of Canada intended, and preparatory proclamations issued by the Marquis de la Fayette. Causes

which prevented M. de Guichen from proceeding to North America. George Rodney arrives, with a squadron, at New York,

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
« ПредыдущаяПродолжить »