Travels in Lycia, Milyas, and the Cibyratis: In Company with the Late Rev. E. T. Daniell, Том 2

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Стр. 92 - One of the most striking spectacles at night on the shores of the jEgean is to see the numerous torches glancing along the shores, and reflected by the still and clear sea, borne by poor fishermen paddling as silently as possible over the rocky shallows in search of the cuttle-fish, which when seen lying beneath the waters in wait for...
Стр. 93 - ... over the rocky shallows in search of the cuttle-fish, which when seen lying beneath the waters in wait for his prey, they dexterously spear, ere the creature has time to dart with the rapidity of an arrow from the weapon about to transfix his soft but firm body. As in ancient times these mollusks constitute now a valuable part of the food of the poor, by whom they are chiefly used.
Стр. 126 - The sponge-fisheries were probably conducted among the ancient Greeks as they are now. Hence, information being obtainable with facility, we find a full account of the sponge in the writings of Aristotle. He appears to have been deeply interested in its history, on account of the link it seemed to present between the animal and vegetable natures. Therefore the question, whether sponges possessed sensation, is discussed by him more than once, and left undecided.
Стр. 50 - ... in these two sides of the monument, lead me to suppose that it contains a series of decrees relating to the settlement of the country after the conquest by the Persians, and to the manner in which the people of the two races and religions are to live together.
Стр. 127 - He distinguishes three varieties: those which arc lax and porous; those of thick and close texture ; and a third kind, called sponges of Achilles, finer, more compact, and stronger than the others. These last were rarest and used to be placed in helmets and in boots, as protections from pressure for the head and feet. They all grow on the rock, adhering not by one point only, nor by the whole surface, but by some extent of their surface. The best kinds grow on the coasts which become suddenly deep.
Стр. 67 - Caspica, is equally plentiful. In fine weather long rows of them may be seen sunning themselves on the banks ; whence, on being alarmed, they would waddle and plunge with great rapidity into the water, apparently always following a leader, who made the first plunge from one end of the row.
Стр. 128 - The best kinds grow on the coasts which become suddenly deep. He attributes the superior fineness of texture in these deep-sea kinds to the greater uniformity of temperature of the water in such places. When alive and before they are washed they are black. Their canals are often inhabited by little Crustacea. Such are the leading points of the account given of sponges in the fifth book of the
Стр. 52 - ... Harpagus, we have no historical grounds for supposing that the followers of the lieutenant were not Persians of the same race as the other followers of the great king. The coins usually called triquetras, from the three-limbed emblem on the exergue, are among the most curious of the Lycian monuments. These coins apparently belong to a certain series of cities, many of which are determined by their resemblance to the Greek names, and at all of which tombs with inscriptions in the same language...
Стр. 7 - ... girls, attended by upwards of five hundred pupils, between four and twelve years of age. The teachers are females, and are paid by the parents. These facts show how alive our Turkish friends of Rhodes are to the value of instruction for the young. We may question and despise the quality of the education given; but the effort to educate, and the spirit which has led to the endowment of public institutions for free education, must command our respect, and force us to acknowledge the good qualities...
Стр. 126 - Laertius. seemed to present between the animal and vegetable natures. Therefore the question whether sponges possessed sensation is discussed by him more than once, and left undecided. The statements for and against their capacity of feeling are, however, fairly put forward. Aristotle distinguishes sponges under two heads, those that might bo cleaned, and those which could not.

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