Toxic Archipelago: A History of Industrial Disease in Japan

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University of Washington Press, 1 июл. 2011 г. - Всего страниц: 352

Every person on the planet is entangled in a web of ecological relationships that link farms and factories with human consumers. Our lives depend on these relationships -- and are imperiled by them as well. Nowhere is this truer than on the Japanese archipelago.

During the nineteenth century, Japan saw the rise of Homo sapiens industrialis, a new breed of human transformed by an engineered, industrialized, and poisonous environment. Toxins moved freely from mines, factory sites, and rice paddies into human bodies.

Toxic Archipelago explores how toxic pollution works its way into porous human bodies and brings unimaginable pain to some of them. Brett Walker examines startling case studies of industrial toxins that know no boundaries: deaths from insecticide contaminations; poisonings from copper, zinc, and lead mining; congenital deformities from methylmercury factory effluents; and lung diseases from sulfur dioxide and asbestos.

This powerful, probing book demonstrates how the Japanese archipelago has become industrialized over the last two hundred years -- and how people and the environment have suffered as a consequence.

 

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Содержание

Knowing Nature
3
1 The Agency of Insects
22
2 The Agency of Chemicals
45
3 Copper Mining and Ecological Collapse
71
4 Engineering Pain in the Jinzū River Basin
108
5 Mercurys Offspring
137
6 Hell at the Hojo Colliery
176
Conclusion
211
Notes
225
Works Cited
251
Index
271
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Об авторе (2011)

Brett L. Walker is Regents' Professor and department chair of history and philosophy at Montana State University, Bozeman. He is author of The Conquest of Ainu Lands: Ecology and Culture in Japanese Expansion, 1590-1800 and The Lost Wolves of Japan.

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