Theories for Everything: An Illustrated History of Science from the Invention of Numbers to String Theory

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National Geographic Books, 2006 - Всего страниц: 407
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Theories for Everything highlights the rich, compelling stories behind science's greatest discoveries and the minds and methods that made them possible. Authoritative, entertaining, and easy to follow, it provides indispensable information on our current theories about the natural and physical world as well as a concise overview of how those ideas evolved.

Filled with illustrations, topical essays, and sidebars, these fascinating pages cover every major topic imaginable?astronomy, the human body and its inner workings, the nature of matter and energy, genetics and evolution, and the complex relationship between mind and behavior. Broken down by subject, the book provides readers with a thorough examination of each set of related theories as they are tested and refined and introduces all the major figures in the history of science, including Aristotle, Archimedes, Copernicus, Galileo, Descartes, Pascal, Newton, Edison, Pasteur, Darwin, Pavlov, Curie, Einstein, Freud, Feynman, and Hawking. The lives of more than 45 scientists are captured in special time lines that add depth and detail to the running narrative.

Each discovery is presented as a detective story: the narrative focuses on how inquisitive investigators posit, revise, and improve upon their descriptions of nature. And like any first-rate mystery, it entices its readers, inviting them to match wits with the scientific sleuths whose theories for everything have unraveled nature's riddles and reshaped how we see our world.
 

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Содержание

INTRODUCTION
8
CHAPTER 1
17
FURTHER READING
392
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Об авторе (2006)

John Langone was a veteran science journalist and author who had been an editor at both Discover and Time magazines, and a contributor to the science section of the New York Times, as well as a Kennedy Fellow at Harvard, a Fulbright fellow in Tokyo, and a fellow at the Center for the Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford. His previous books for National Geographic were The Mystery of Time and The New How Things Work.

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